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Veteran Access to Care Act Will Cost an Additional $54 Billion per Year | U.S. PATRIOT NEWS & REVIEWS

Veteran Access to Care Act Will Cost an Additional $54 Billion per Year

Well, the information is available if you want to see it. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that the cost to provide veterans with non-VA medical care who cannot get a medical appointment within 30 days or live more than 40 miles from VA hospital at $54 billion dollars per year. Billion, with a B.

House Veterans Affairs Committee Holds Hearing On Access To VA Healthcare. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
House Veterans Affairs Committee Holds Hearing On Access To VA Healthcare. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
The estimate for H.R. 3230, Veteran Access to Care Act of 2014, is stunning. This number is based on the VA currently having 8.4 million veterans enrolled now, and potentially 8 million additional veterans that are qualified to enroll, but have not. The CBO estimates that if health care were easier for veterans to get, more would enroll and the ones currently using the VA system would increase their usage.

Additionally, there would be delays in getting additional members enrolled in the program and that it would simply not be financially sustainable in the long run. Either we fix the system we currently have, or get rid of the VA entirely and move our veterans into more traditional health care programs.

Getting rid of the VA is not feasible. The specialized medicine the VA hospitals provide to veterans would be cost prohibitive under any other form of health care due to the paucity of cases outside of veteran groups, so we are forced into figuring out the best method of fixing the VA system.

[quote_left]”The Veteran’s Administration doesn’t have a ‘getting’ money problem, they have a ‘wasting’ money problem.”[/quote_left]I am all for providing veterans with the care they need, but throwing money at the problem is not going to solve anything. This measure must be temporary and our country has to get its fiscal house in order. The Veteran’s Administration doesn’t have a ‘getting’ money problem, they have a ‘wasting’ money problem. An outside regulatory group with the authority to get rid of problems and curb abuses in the system needs to be formed. It needs to be composed of people who are interested in solving problems, not in living off government wages.

Getting rid of a third of the bureaucrats in the VA would be a good start. Use the money saved to hire additional doctors and nurses and ensure they are trained in the problems that the veterans are experiencing. Don’t spend more; spend smarter.

Unfortunately, once a government agency is created, they are nearly impossible to destroy, and with the VA administration centers and hospitals being unionized, it is going to be an incredible feat to even hold the people at the center of this scandal accountable and punish them for anything. Unless, of course, the FBI does find evidence of criminal activity that can’t be sloughed off as just stupidity and the people responsible are charged with crimes.

Personally, I think we will be lucky if any crimes are exposed. Anyone involved with the negligence that permeates the system will be moved to a different position or asked to retire early. The only people who will be punished are the veterans.

Disclaimer: The opinions in this article are the author’s own and do not reflect the views of this website. This author accepts all responsibility for the opinions and viewpoints in this article.

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Matt Towns

Matt is a former military journalist who spent 10 years in the US Navy. He served in various posts during his career, including a couple of deployments on the USS Valley Forge (CG-50). After leaving the Navy, he worked in management for a number of years before opening his own businesses. He ran those businesses until 2012 when he chose to leave the retail industry and return to writing. Matt currently works as a freelance writer, contributing to the US Patriot blog and other websites about political affairs, military activities and sailing.
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2 thoughts on “Veteran Access to Care Act Will Cost an Additional $54 Billion per Year

  1. I’m retiring after 20+ years active duty service. I have medical records which are complete and my command knows exactly how fit I am and if I have any limitations and those are well documented. Why is it so difficult for a veteran like me to get into the VA system and pick up with my health care needs (if any) the day after I leave? Why all the red tape getting a disability approved when the active duty side already has more than enough information on me? It seems obvious to me that the government doesn’t really want to assist me when I retire and that is why the systeme is so messed up – they want it that way.

    1. In this case, the numbers don’t lie. Isn’t it strange that if the VA provided great care, easily for eligible veterans, the enrollment rate would be well over 50%. That was the number that caught my eye while researching this blog.
      Personally, I agree with you. The government does not want veterans using their VA health benefits so they have made it difficult to get them.
      And it’s a damn shame.

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