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The Other Side of a Military Deployment: Humanitarian Work | U.S. PATRIOT NEWS & REVIEWS

The Other Side of a Military Deployment: Humanitarian Work

There is a lot more to America’s military than meets the eye. Sure, they are the most powerful fighting force on the planet, but they are also tasked with a lot of other responsibilities that don’t require firing a shot or dropping a bomb. Quite frankly, the United States military is just as good at saving lives as they are at taking them. I, for one, am extremely proud when our troops are deployed to help all over the world on various humanitarian missions.

I remember watching on TV as the horrible chaos that was the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti in 2010 unfolded. I could not believe what my eyes were seeing; all that death and destruction did not seem like it could possibly be real. For some 24 hours, I stayed up to date with what was going on with the news and the chaos that was taking place; it was almost surreal. But then something happened; you started seeing American military personnel helping out. The more you saw them over the next several days, the more the desperate situation seemed to be improving. It is a scene that has been repeated many times all over the world; people everywhere know they count on the USA to help in times of need.

A US Osprey delivers supplies.

On November 8th, 2013 Typhoon Haiyan (known as Yolanda in the Philippines) struck the Islands of Leyte and Samar in the Philippines with winds of over 200 miles per hour and a storm surge that was as high as a two story building. The typhoon, which was the strongest ever to make landfall in recorded history, left thousands dead and an incredible amount of destruction in its wake. I was in Thailand at the time, and something called me to volunteer my help there. That is when I got to see first-hand the truly great job that our American military does when they help out in times of humanitarian crisis.

I arrived 10 days after the storm hit. When I was landing at the Tacloban Airport in the Province of Leyte, I looked out the window and could not believe what I was seeing. Almost nothing at all was left standing: no trees, no buildings, just piles of debris as far as you can see, and it was even worse once I was out of the plane and on the ground. Over the next few days, I would see death and destruction on a scale that I never thought I would experience in my life. I described my time there to my family and friends as the best and worst thing I ever did in my life.

But despite all of the sadness that I would experience in the next few weeks, there was something that made me proud too, that was the help that the American military was giving to the Filipino people. Every day, American Osprey and C-130 Aircraft, along with countless helicopters, ferried supplies all over the country to the areas that were badly impacted by the storm. It was an amazing sight to watch them come in and rapidly load supplies, and then quickly take off again. That mission alone is credited with saving thousands of lives and has only extended the respect that Filipino’s have for our country.

So the next time you pass by a soldier on the street, in an airport or anywhere else for that matter, don’t just thank them for defending us in the wars they fight; thank them for the great humanitarian work they do all over the world too.

Disclaimer: The content in this article is the opinion of the writer and does not necessarily reflect the policies or opinions of US Patriot Tactical.

Craig Smith

Craig has been writing for several years but just recently made freelance writing a full time profession after leaving behind 26 years working in the swimming pool construction industry. He served four years in the US Air Force as an Imagery Interpreter Specialist in Okinawa, Japan and at SAC Headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska. As a staunch supporter of law enforcement personnel, emergency medical technicians, firemen, search and rescue personnel and those who serve in the military, Craig is proud to contribute to the US Patriot blog on their behalf.
Craig Smith
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Craig Smith

Craig has been writing for several years but just recently made freelance writing a full time profession after leaving behind 26 years working in the swimming pool construction industry. He served four years in the US Air Force as an Imagery Interpreter Specialist in Okinawa, Japan and at SAC Headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska. As a staunch supporter of law enforcement personnel, emergency medical technicians, firemen, search and rescue personnel and those who serve in the military, Craig is proud to contribute to the US Patriot blog on their behalf.
Craig Smith
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