Battle of the Alamo

The Fall of the Alamo

The Battle of the Alamo was a battle between Mexico and the Republic of Texas that took place in San Antonio, Texas from February 23 – March 6, 1836.

Read on to learn more about the significance of this battle, the men that were involved and the legacy it has left for the state of Texas.

Background of the Battle

The Alamo originally served as a home for Spanish missionaries and was later converted into a fort for Spanish soldiers. Americans immigrants — “Texians” — eventually settled the area and began utilizing the 3 acres of land and the adobe style fort during the Texas Revolution.

The Texians knew General Santa Anna would be coming to San Antonio and knew the danger that would be involved. They discussed whether or not they should stay and protect or leave and retreat but it was James Bowie, a well-known American pioneer, that first decided he would protect the Alamo.

The Battle of the Alamo

Other Texians joined Bowie and totaled about two hundred that would fight against thousands of Mexicans. On February 23, 1836 the Mexicans arrived and fought for 13 days against the outnumbered Texians but by March 6, the Mexicans had killed every Texian soldier in the Alamo. It is said that James Bowie was bedridden during the battle of the Alamo and was most likely fighting the Mexicans from his bed.

About 200 Texians died and more than 500 Mexicans died during The Battle of the Alamo. The Texians soldiers included people from across the world, many of whom are well known to Americans today. Some of these people include:

Seal of the State of Texas – Sourced by commons.wikimedia.com
  • Davy Crockett – American frontiersman and congressman
  • James Bowie – American pioneer
  • Micajah Autry – American poet and lawyer

Significance of the Alamo

Despite the Texians defeat during the Battle of the Alamo, their resilience, bravery and determination have inspired Texans for years. The phrase “Remember the Alamo!” became a battle cry for the remainder of the Texas Revolution and is still featured on the reverse side of Texas’s official state seal — reminding Texans of the courage and fearlessness that took place during The Battle of the Alamo.

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