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Primitive Shelter: Debris Hut Basics | U.S. PATRIOT NEWS & REVIEWS

Primitive Shelter: Debris Hut Basics

As much as possible, we try to be prepared for all of life’s events and set-backs. There are times, however, that all we have available to us is our minds – no tools, no gadgets and no supplies. When that happens, it is our metal supply closet that must carry us through to tomorrow. When this is the case in the field and a form of shelter is needed to protect you from the cold and rain, the debris hut stands out as a great option.

The big appeal to the debris hut is that all of the materials should be available on the ground and can be collected with nothing but knowledge and your hands.  There are some parts that would benefit from a good survival knife and some cordage, but it is not necessary to have them.

To start off, find the location you want to build. Be sure that it is an area that won’t flood and, if possible, can block some wind to make your shelter more effective. The area should be about twice as long as you are tall and about as wide as you are tall.

Now, find a “pole” about as thick as your forearm and twice your height. The straighter the pole, the better your shelter will be and the easier it will be to build it. Find two “Y” branches to prop the pole on top of. They should be about wrist thick and stand about hip high. Both braces will be used on the head end of the shelter, while the foot end of the pole will rest against the ground.

Collect branches and sticks that are about 2 fingers to a wrist thick and lean them against the main pole. This will make a form of ribbing to support the rest of the debris.

Find dead bushes and as many small sticks as possible and pile them on top of the ribbing. This will make a sort of “mesh” work to keep the leaves and grass from just falling through.

With all of that, it is time to add the grass, leaves, and whatever else you can find along those lines. Pile it on top of everything and make it thick. When it is all said and done, the debris should be about as thick as your arm is long. The colder and wetter it is out there, the more you will need.

Now, pile debris inside the shelter. After a thick bed is made, crawl in and smash it down so you can add more. Do that about three times to make a thick, fluffy bed to protect you from the earth. Stuff that shelter with as much debris as your can while leaving enough room to crawl inside. Come bed time, you crawl in and pile leaves and grass on top of yourself and “close” off the doorway to keep warm.

When all else fails, having a brain full of skills backed by experiences will save the day. This is not the ideal shelter type to survive in, but you will survive and no tools are needed to make it happen. Next camping trip, give it a try and find the easiest way for you to put together the cheapest hut there is.

Disclaimer: The content in this article is the opinion of the writer and does not necessarily reflect the policies or opinions of US Patriot Tactical.

Seth Belt

Seth grew up in Southern Arizona before joining the U.S. Navy. While serving in the Navy, Seth was an anti-narcotics operator and an anti-submarine operator for 5 years. He was lucky enough to travel to many of the Central and South American countries, as well as visiting many South East Asian nations and islands. One of Seth’s greatest joys from his time in the Navy was teaching new Sailors firearms education and safety. After leaving the Navy in 2010, Seth returned to Arizona and had a rough time learning how to be a civilian again, often working jobs that could barely pay the bills. After going to school, Seth became an Emergency Medical Technician in the Phoenix Valley, where he now lives with his wife and son.His areas of knowledge cover military, firearms, and emergency medicine.
Seth Belt
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